Tag Archives: Project Success

How do we assess project success?

How do we assess project success? Before one can answer this question, we need to provide the proper context and the various variables. For example, project success from whose perspective? Do we assess project management success, technical success, or objectives success? What would be the criteria for evaluating success? What would be the criteria for determining success for any of these dimensions? We will do our best to answer these questions and more here. Consequently, how to define success or failure? We need to look at this question from different viewpoints.

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Why did I write a book about leading megaprojects?

Let me start with a few notes and clarifications. We define megaprojects as massive projects with capital costs around US$1 billion and a high level of complexity. Industrial megaprojects seem to perform better than infrastructure megaprojects. However, at best, what we have seen reported is a 35% success rate on the high end and as low as 0.5% on the questionable end. We do question the 0.5%, although it is reported by a reputable source. We also know that many organizations do follow a stage-gate process and might have project management systems. Then, why more projects fail than succeed? The response requires an analysis of the root causes. Next, the challenge is on finding a tailored approach for leading megaprojects concept to success. SUKAD has such an approach; therefore, it makes sense to write about it.

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What is the ‘integrated project management solution’ that will go into Uruk PPM Platform™?

This blog post is part of a chapter in Leading Megaprojects, a Tailored Approach. This part explains The SUKAD Way for Managing Projects and its various components. However, the focus is on how to integrate these components into a holistic solution, the Uruk PPM Platform.

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leading a personal project using the SUKAD Way's CAMMP Model

Does this image intimidate you?

Does this image intimidate you? If it does, good, it should be, but only at first look. If you have a project, a serious project, that requires a great deal of effort and money, STOP thinking about it, you WILL FAIL, so do not WASTE your time and hard-earned money. This last statement is applicable, ONLY if the image intimidates you. Consequently, we will start this post with a dose of reality before we can help you learn how to lead a personal project.

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De Bono Six Hats

Are projects done in a vacuum?

In numerous discussions online, even in guides like the PMBOK Guide, there is so much focus on the project rather than the organization and on the project manager rather than organizational project management.

What I mean is Continue reading

What is CAMMP™?

In this post, we will view CAMMP™ by the numbers and images

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Stage-Gate Process, Project Management Methodology

How to lead large and complex (mega) projects to success?

This post is specific to Executives, especially those leading Project Owners’s Organizations.

How to lead large and complex (mega) projects to success?

How you can minimize the chance of delays and overruns and maximizing value to your shareholders?

In a recent article, we wrote and recorded video on why project owners organizations are afraid of project management. That was a tough article to write since it could have touched on organizational culture and pride but nonetheless, the message has to be said. Continue reading

IMHO, Ajam Thoughts, Project Success

In the past, we did write articles about project success and the SUKAD Four Dimensions of Project Success. Today, we share a video.

Click on the image to view the video.

How is the PMBOK Guide changing? Part 1

Introduction

Over the years, the PMBOK Guide has the ANSI stamp on the cover, giving the impression that the whole guide is an ANSI Standard. However, inside the guide, one can find a mention that the ANSI Standard was part of Chapter 3 in the 3rd and 4th edition of the guide and an Annex in the 5th edition. Yet, people missed this point.

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