Tag Archives: PMI

Bridge the Gap

What are the gaps left open by professional associations?

This blog post is extracted from Chapter 6 of our upcoming book, Project Management beyond Waterfall and Agile.

Summary of Previous Chapters

To summarize the relevant information from the earlier chapters, the current practice is:

  • PMI and ISO are clear that they are not offering the community a method or methodology. They are providing a set of processes, project management process groups, and subject/knowledge areas. ISO 21500 mentions the need for product and support processes but does not address them.
  • IPMA is also clear that it does not offer “how-to’s”; rather, it advocates the competence elements for managing projects. Here again, there is no method.
  • GPM offers a method, but although its dependence on the process groups as a project life cycle is a weakness, its sustainability elements are of great value,
  • It is important to state that PRINCE2® is a method, which is good; but for some reason, it is mostly known in the UK and other countries with organizations that have a UK influenceTh e author does not offer a dedicated chapter to PRINCE2, because CAMMP™ is an alternate solution that is more flexible and wider in scope.

Transition, Understanding the Challenges

The hypothesis of this book is that, despite the high value each professional association offers, there are still gaps in project management practice. Practitioners still struggle to apply what they learn in the real world, on real projects, and on different types and classes of projects.

In the world of projects and project management, certain fixed concepts apply regardless of industry or domain. Many variables are highly unique to the context of a given project. 

Yes, organizations can use the IPMA’s ICB® and develop their methods using the competence elements.

Yes, organizations can use the process groups and subject groups from PMI/ISO to develop an internal methodological approach.

Some are doing so, but not enough!

In large organizations with abundant resources, their staff could explore the world of project management and choose what is best for their organizations from the available “menu” of options. Even in such organizations, one can find that they stick to one menu item, or one resource, for one reason or another.

While large organizations may limit their choices, small and medium organizations may not even have the luxury of selection. Consequently, they constrain their project management system—assuming they have one—and depend on the common sense of their accidental project managers. These organizations manage projects, or, more accurately, “execute” projects through accidental project managers, then wonder why the failure rate is so high. It is also possible
that these organizations think that they are delivering the project successfully; this might be so, but are they using clear criteria for measuring project success?

Bridge the GapThese practice gaps exist because organizations tend to box themselves into limited options. The gaps present us with opportunities to provide workable solutions. The fundamental principle of the offered solution revolves around integrating the best of what exists and offering it in a practical approach that can work for small or mega projects, regardless of domain, type, or class of project. Th is is a modest attempt to save organizations much research and development work.

 

What do you think?

Is anyone out there?

I have been leading a PMP exam prep workshop all week and every time we do this workshop we get questions like what we are listing today. We have touched on these points in the past but as the fifth edition of the PMBOK Guide will be coming to an end and the sixth edition arrives in the next few weeks, it is an opportunity to ask.

We have touched on these points in the past but as the fifth edition of the PMBOK Guide will be coming to an end and the sixth edition arrives in the next few weeks, it is an opportunity to ask these questions again.

The challenge is there anyone out there, in the PMI world? Is there anyone in PMI that can answer these questions for us? Continue reading

Should I pursue a PMP certification or consider alternatives?

Project Management certification is highly popular among individuals and organizations.

Although the PMP® might not be the best for enhancing organizational performance, it is the preferred certification by those who want to make their CV looks better for potential employers; especially if they are looking for a new job. Continue reading

Why did we develop CAMMP™ and how has it progressed?

This blog post is an audio presentation.  Continue reading

Why some organizations do not follow proper PM Practices? مع تسجيل صوتي بالعربي

We often hear from practitioners and read on social media platforms that many organizations around the world, do not implement proper project management practices. Maybe the situation is different from one country to another, and one cannot generalize. However, the question is valid, why (some) organizations do not follow ‘proper’ project management practices? Continue reading

Project Management, Social Media, and (mis)information (مع تسجيل فيديو بالعربي)

It is quite common nowadays the use of social media to network, share knowledge, and learn. Project management is one of those domains that we also use social media for.

It is also common to find many groups on social media sites dedicated to project management, especially those sites advocating the PMP certifications and posting questions daily or hourly.

What are some of the issues, challenges, problems, and opportunities that we see with such groups? Continue reading

Where is the beef (in the context of the PMBOK Guide)?

Here we go again, the craze about the PMP6 is here

PMP Exam in relation to PMBOK Guide Changes

We are only in January 2017, the PMBOK® Guide sixth edition is not even out yet, and we are starting to hear about PMP6. Obviously, there is no such a thing as PMP6 – the PMP is the PMP. However, people use this term, PMP6, to refer to the updated exam that will be based on the 6th edition of the guide. Continue reading

How has the SUKAD CAMMP™ Model evolved?

I have been privileged in my career.

In a recent article, I have shared some thoughts and reflections on career management and my passion for project management.

I had opportunities to work with great companies after my Masters Degree. My first eight years with Exxon Chemical (before the ExxonMobil years), taught me project management well. In a short eight-year span, Exxon gave me the opportunity to work in estimating, control, project engineering, construction, and project management lead roles on small and multiple projects and on a mega project – from the USA Gulf Coast to Europe, Japan, and South East Asia.

Those years were the foundation for The Customizable and Adaptable Methodology for Managing Projects™.

Continue reading

Is the project management community receptive to new ideas?

Is the project management community receptive to new ideas? Maybe we should zoom in and ask: are professionals who subscribe to one professional association open to things from outside the association?

Will share a couple of stories.

Continue reading

What a 20-year difference will do to the PMP certificate

In the last article, we wrote about the PMP and if the PMP exam represents the real world.

Then, a post on LinkedIn triggered this post where a person posted his newly achieved certificate claiming that he is now “A Certified Project Manager.” A quick look at his profile on LinkedIn shows that this is a young professional, 3-year out of college, and his experience has been pure engineering; technical roles, not a project management role.

Continue reading