Category Archives: Project Management Methodology

This sub-category is to discuss project management methodologies

What are some of the challenges in the PM Practice?

This post is extracted from a chapter in our upcoming book on Project Management with the title, Project Management beyond Waterfall and Agile. Continue reading

Bridge the Gap

What are the gaps left open by professional associations?

This blog post is extracted from Chapter 6 of our upcoming book, Project Management beyond Waterfall and Agile.

Summary of Previous Chapters

To summarize the relevant information from the earlier chapters, the current practice is:

  • PMI and ISO are clear that they are not offering the community a method or methodology. They are providing a set of processes, project management process groups, and subject/knowledge areas. ISO 21500 mentions the need for product and support processes but does not address them.
  • IPMA is also clear that it does not offer “how-to’s”; rather, it advocates the competence elements for managing projects. Here again, there is no method.
  • GPM offers a method, but although its dependence on the process groups as a project life cycle is a weakness, its sustainability elements are of great value,
  • It is important to state that PRINCE2® is a method, which is good; but for some reason, it is mostly known in the UK and other countries with organizations that have a UK influenceTh e author does not offer a dedicated chapter to PRINCE2, because CAMMP™ is an alternate solution that is more flexible and wider in scope.

Transition, Understanding the Challenges

The hypothesis of this book is that, despite the high value each professional association offers, there are still gaps in project management practice. Practitioners still struggle to apply what they learn in the real world, on real projects, and on different types and classes of projects.

In the world of projects and project management, certain fixed concepts apply regardless of industry or domain. Many variables are highly unique to the context of a given project. 

Yes, organizations can use the IPMA’s ICB® and develop their methods using the competence elements.

Yes, organizations can use the process groups and subject groups from PMI/ISO to develop an internal methodological approach.

Some are doing so, but not enough!

In large organizations with abundant resources, their staff could explore the world of project management and choose what is best for their organizations from the available “menu” of options. Even in such organizations, one can find that they stick to one menu item, or one resource, for one reason or another.

While large organizations may limit their choices, small and medium organizations may not even have the luxury of selection. Consequently, they constrain their project management system—assuming they have one—and depend on the common sense of their accidental project managers. These organizations manage projects, or, more accurately, “execute” projects through accidental project managers, then wonder why the failure rate is so high. It is also possible
that these organizations think that they are delivering the project successfully; this might be so, but are they using clear criteria for measuring project success?

Bridge the GapThese practice gaps exist because organizations tend to box themselves into limited options. The gaps present us with opportunities to provide workable solutions. The fundamental principle of the offered solution revolves around integrating the best of what exists and offering it in a practical approach that can work for small or mega projects, regardless of domain, type, or class of project. Th is is a modest attempt to save organizations much research and development work.

 

What do you think?

How can we travel the project journey, successfully?

Road Maps to Travel the Project Journey: End-to-End

Almost every organization today deliver value to their shareholders, customers, or citizens and the community through projects. The vital question is how to enhance the chance of success, deliver excellence, and maximize value? How to ensure that the management of these projects will produce maximum benefits? Continue reading

CAMMP-PMBOK-PRINCE2

How do we compare CAMMP with other guides?

At times, our clients ask us how do we compare the SUKAD CAMMP Model with other methods or guides. The quick answer is in this image. Continue reading

Should I pursue a PMP certification or consider alternatives?

Project Management certification is highly popular among individuals and organizations.

Although the PMP® might not be the best for enhancing organizational performance, it is the preferred certification by those who want to make their CV looks better for potential employers; especially if they are looking for a new job. Continue reading

The Extended Project Team

Who are the people involved in delivering a project?

This post is a section of a chapter on project management plan. It is per our CAMMP™ Model, Version 3, and from the Project Management beyond Waterfall and Agile book that will be published later this summer.

This section addresses the people aspects, a vital section of the Project Management Plan of a given project. Continue reading

CAMMP™ project life cycle, with the three phases

How to apply process groups during a project’s phase?

The following post is related to our upcoming book, titled Project Management beyond Waterfall and Agile.

In this post, we focus on how to apply the high-level processes (process groups) within a typical project discovery phase. Continue reading

Possible project life cycle model integrating adaptive principles

Is the project life cycle fixed or varies?

A recent post on the project life cycle has been generating quite a bit of interest and discussion on LinkedIn. The post is “Once again, what is the project life cycle?

Well, in this follow-up article, we will highlight some of the confusions that remain and present a few project life cycle examples. Continue reading

Once again, what is the project life cycle?

Once again, what is the project life cycle?

Why this question?

Because it is our belief that the most common misunderstanding in project management today, especially among those who follow PMI and learned project management through the PMBOK Guide. Notice, we used the term misunderstanding because  Continue reading

How to lead mega projects to success – part 2 (with videos English + Arabic)

Every once in a while we focus on a certain topic and write a few articles about. Recently, we had a few posts with videos on terminology differences, and before that, we cover agile for capital projects. The most recent posts have been about large-complex, or mega projects.

We have to admit, today’s post might reiterate some points from earlier posts — AND — it is also a bit commercial in nature since it is related to a learning program that SUKAD has developed and is offering to deal with the challenges of mega projects.

Continue reading