Category Archives: Applying Project Management

The Applying Project Management sub-category is specific to topics on how to apply project management principles.

Where is the Beef – sorry Agile in PMBOK Guide? PGR3

We have been hearing about the #PMBOK Guide going Agile for a year now; or more. However, now the new #PMBOK Guide is out, where is #Agile?

This question reminds me of an old Wendy’s commercial about “where is the beef?” Continue reading

What are some of the challenges in the PM Practice?

This post is extracted from a chapter in our upcoming book on Project Management with the title, Project Management beyond Waterfall and Agile. Continue reading

How to reduce the size of the PMBOK Guide? PGR1

With the recent release of the PMBOK Guide edition, I felt it is important to reflect back on something I wrote a long time ago and worth sharing again. Continue reading

Bridge the Gap

What are the gaps left open by professional associations?

This blog post is extracted from Chapter 6 of our upcoming book, Project Management beyond Waterfall and Agile.

Summary of Previous Chapters

To summarize the relevant information from the earlier chapters, the current practice is:

  • PMI and ISO are clear that they are not offering the community a method or methodology. They are providing a set of processes, project management process groups, and subject/knowledge areas. ISO 21500 mentions the need for product and support processes but does not address them.
  • IPMA is also clear that it does not offer “how-to’s”; rather, it advocates the competence elements for managing projects. Here again, there is no method.
  • GPM offers a method, but although its dependence on the process groups as a project life cycle is a weakness, its sustainability elements are of great value,
  • It is important to state that PRINCE2® is a method, which is good; but for some reason, it is mostly known in the UK and other countries with organizations that have a UK influenceTh e author does not offer a dedicated chapter to PRINCE2, because CAMMP™ is an alternate solution that is more flexible and wider in scope.

Transition, Understanding the Challenges

The hypothesis of this book is that, despite the high value each professional association offers, there are still gaps in project management practice. Practitioners still struggle to apply what they learn in the real world, on real projects, and on different types and classes of projects.

In the world of projects and project management, certain fixed concepts apply regardless of industry or domain. Many variables are highly unique to the context of a given project. 

Yes, organizations can use the IPMA’s ICB® and develop their methods using the competence elements.

Yes, organizations can use the process groups and subject groups from PMI/ISO to develop an internal methodological approach.

Some are doing so, but not enough!

In large organizations with abundant resources, their staff could explore the world of project management and choose what is best for their organizations from the available “menu” of options. Even in such organizations, one can find that they stick to one menu item, or one resource, for one reason or another.

While large organizations may limit their choices, small and medium organizations may not even have the luxury of selection. Consequently, they constrain their project management system—assuming they have one—and depend on the common sense of their accidental project managers. These organizations manage projects, or, more accurately, “execute” projects through accidental project managers, then wonder why the failure rate is so high. It is also possible
that these organizations think that they are delivering the project successfully; this might be so, but are they using clear criteria for measuring project success?

Bridge the GapThese practice gaps exist because organizations tend to box themselves into limited options. The gaps present us with opportunities to provide workable solutions. The fundamental principle of the offered solution revolves around integrating the best of what exists and offering it in a practical approach that can work for small or mega projects, regardless of domain, type, or class of project. Th is is a modest attempt to save organizations much research and development work.

 

What do you think?

How can we travel the project journey, successfully?

Road Maps to Travel the Project Journey: End-to-End

Almost every organization today deliver value to their shareholders, customers, or citizens and the community through projects. The vital question is how to enhance the chance of success, deliver excellence, and maximize value? How to ensure that the management of these projects will produce maximum benefits? Continue reading

Is there one team for a given project?

In the previous post, we talked about Who are the people involved in delivering a project?

In that article, we discussed the various components of the Extended Project Team, Project Team, and Project Management Team. So regardless of what team we are talking about, is there one team for a given project?

What we mean here – on a project life cycle – is the team constant? Continue reading

The Extended Project Team

Who are the people involved in delivering a project?

This post is a section of a chapter on project management plan. It is per our CAMMP™ Model, Version 3, and from the Project Management beyond Waterfall and Agile book that will be published later this summer.

This section addresses the people aspects, a vital section of the Project Management Plan of a given project. Continue reading

ما هي التقارير التي ننشرها عن المشاريع؟

في هذه الحلقة – عرض مع صوت – نتكلم عن التقارير في ادارة المشاريع، انواعها، محتوياتها، توقيتها، ومن المسؤول عنها. مع امثلة عن مؤشرات اداء المشروع والمؤشرات في المنظمة.

Continue reading

Why, what, who … of project reports

In response to a request on our YouTube Channel, we are publishing this presentation on project management reports via slide share.

Continue reading

Murphy's Law

What happens when Murphy takes over the house?

Many, if not most people in project management know Murphy or Murphy’s Law. According to the Murphy’s Law Website, “If anything can go wrong, it will“. For more information about the origin of this law, visit http://www.murphys-laws.com/murphy/murphy-true.html.

What does this mean to us in project management?

Continue reading