Would you pursue PMP if the processes are like this?

PMBOK® Guide changes in number of processes

Over the years, the number of the processes in the PMBOK® Guide has ranged between 39 and 47, if I am not mistaken. The largest number of processes is in the latest edition, published in 2013.

One will also notice that from one edition to another, a few processes are added, some are deleted, and a few possible move from one knowledge area to another or one process group to another. These changes and other information are the subject of a book on the PMBOK® Guide that I started about a year ago but have not had a chance to finish.

Is there a need for change?

Now, I am working on another book – a simulation of a sample project – and in this book, we use the processes and process groups along with a project life cycle model. As I work on this book, and reflect back on my experience and the workshops we deliver on the PMBOK® Guide, we realize the need to revisit the guide and its processes.

Splitting planning processes

We are not ready to discuss all the details at this time. However, the last three articles that we published addressed some of these points, in particular, in relation to planning. The first article addressed the need to split planning into two plans, the second article covered the ‘management planning processes’, and the third article covered the ‘detailed planning processes.

What else needs to change?

We believe that besides planning, there are other areas where a change can be useful. In this article we will not discuss the proposed changes since they would require extensive coverage and we may address in a series of articles in the future. For now, we will post an image of the proposed revised chart of processes. The image is preliminary and may result in more or less processes.

Please note we did not consider other knowledge areas at this time, although we think there is a need for at least one more knowledge area. Further, we are not including any domain specific knowledge areas, like safety, sustainability, or other topic.

Mounir Ajam Proposed Revisions to the PMBOK Guide Processes

In the above chart, the font colors and shading are explained on the bottom for clarity. The processes of the planning process group are highlighted in yellow or green to reflect the proposed split between management planning processes and detailed planning processes, which we covered in earlier articles.

Would you pursue PMP if the processes are like this?

We are not sure what you think about the above and want to hear from you.

  1. Do you agree, that the number of processes should grow? The number does not have to grow to 64 processes like what is proposed in the chart.
  2. Do you think we need more or less processes?
  3. Do you think there is a reason to keeping the number of processes in the 40’s?

Finally, the main question: do you think people will pursue the PMP if the number of processes is over, 50, 60, or even 70?

Waiting for your debate!

 

 

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  • SUKAD Admin

    This comment was posted IRAQ IT Enterprise Infrastructure Projects and Tenders
    group by Salah Alazawi,
    https://www.linkedin.com/groupItemview=&gid=1788861&item=5967977752408637443&type=member&commentID=discussion%3A5967977752408637443%3Agroup%3A1788861&trk=hb_ntf_COMMENTED_ON_GROUP_DISCUSSION_YOU_CREATED#commentID_discussion%3A5967977752408637443%3Agroup%3A1788861
    The number of processes will be grow so people will not be able to pursue the PMP

  • SUKAD Admin

    This comment was posted on LinkedIn PMLink – Project Management Link – Project, Program & Portfolio Managers, PMP, PMBOK, PMO group by SUKAD
    Group,
    https://www.linkedin.com/groupItemview=&gid=59531&item=5967977189570797569&type=member&commentID=discussion%3A5967977189570797569%3Agroup%3A59531&trk=hb_ntf_COMMENTED_ON_GROUP_DISCUSSION_YOU_CREATED#commentID_discussion%3A5967977189570797569%3Agroup%3A59531

    Tom

    Thank you for valuable input.
    You raise more than one point.
    1. Why people going to Agile: i cannot answer this but i can say that this could be (a) new trend
    (b) projects are still failing so instead of knowing why we blame the
    methodology
    (c) other reasons. However, in general Agile might be useful in
    certain environment but is not in others.
    2. Adding processes delays projects – this is like saying if we plan properly we delay projects. Here we need to fall back on the concept of one-size does NOT fit all. Yes,small and simple projects can use simplified processes but project management is not only about small and simple projects or software projects.
    3. More processes will add burden. Let us consider this example, if an organization have an important project (all projects should be important) with some complexity and would be considered large project … to assign a project manager do they just
    pick who is available or maybe they should use a selection process to identify
    the right candidate for the right job? If they have to identify a candidate
    —- is not this a process? How would this add burden to the project?

    Regards

    Mounir Ajam

  • SUKAD Admin

    This
    comment was posted on LinkedIn PMLink – Project
    Management Link – Project, Program & Portfolio Managers, PMP, PMBOK, PMO
    group by Tom
    Huereca, PMP, SMC, SFC, AEC,
    https://www.linkedin.com/groupItem?view=&gid=59531&item=5967977189570797569&type=member&commentID=discussion%3A5967977189570797569%3Agroup%3A59531&trk=hb_ntf_COMMENTED_ON_GROUP_DISCUSSION_YOU_CREATED#commentID_discussion%3A5967977189570797569%3Agroup%3A59531

    Would you pursue PMP if the processes are like
    this? I am already PMP certified, but would others pursue PMP certification if
    the processes are like this? I am sure there would be a lot of hesitancy to
    pursue PMP with the cost in time and dollars required for PMP certification,
    especially companies that would be picking up this cost. On an individual
    basis, would those who would have to pay their own cost purse PMP? A lot of the
    industry is turning to agile and the pursuit of agile certifications, I also
    have my scum master (SMC) and agile expert (AEC) certifications. I fully intend
    to maintain my PMP certification but also see why many in the industry are
    turning to agile. By adding more processes, this is viewed as adding more
    delays to moving projects from inception to customer delivery. One size does
    not fit all. So many processes would be modified to drop to meet the specific
    needs of those using the PMBOK® Guide. Adding more processes will add more
    burden rather than streamlining the processes as a standard which would allow
    more flexibility for those choosing or required to implement this using the
    PMBOK® Guide. As the title indicates, this is a guide, not the bible for
    implementation. Would adding more processes enhance the “guide” by adding more
    insight and things that should or need to consider in a project? More is not
    always better and could become viewed more as impediments and burdensome.

    • Tom

      Thank you for valuable input.

      You raise more than one point.

      1. Why people going to Agile: i cannot answer this but i can say that this could be (a) new trend (b) projects are still failing so instead of knowing why we blame the methodology (c) other reasons. However, in general Agile might be useful in certain environment but is not in others.

      2. Adding processes delays projects – this is like saying if we plan properly we delay projects. Here we need to fall back on the concept of one-size does NOT fit all. Yes, small and simple projects can use simplified processes but project management is not only about small and simple projects or software projects.

      3. More processes will add burden. Let us consider this example, if an organization have an important project (all projects should be important) with some complexity and would be considered large project … to assign a project manager do they just pick who is available or maybe they should use a selection process to identify the right candidate for the right job? If they have to identify a candidate —- is not this a process? How would this add burden to the project?

      Regards
      Mounir Ajam

  • Farrukh Hasan

    I feel that the number of processes is already high. Do we really need to go into that much detail, and will it really be productive? Remember that the PMBOK Guide is a book of standards, not a text book. Since it is the basic document for the PMP exam, it should be kept simple; for details one can always refer to text books.

    • Dear Farrukh
      The PMBOK Guide is not for the PMP exam – since when a project management standard and field of practice is limited to 1 out of 50 certifications in PM?

      The guide include the standard for managing projects and these projects could be large and complex. For small and simple project, I agree, one can simplify the process.

      However, whether you have 10 very high level processes, or 20, or a 100 smaller processes – what is in the pmbok is necessary and not even enough.